Peking Mallard Breasts

Peking Mallard Breasts

Peking Mallard Breasts

Peking Mallard Breasts with Hoi Sin, Spring Onions & Cucumber, by Rob Green

For the marinade, score the skin on the duck breasts in a crisscross pattern. Mix all the ingredients together in a bowl and pour over the duck, gently rubbing into the meat. Cover with Clingfilm and leave in the fridge for at least 3 hours or overnight, if time allows.

Preheat the oven to 150°C/130°C (fan)/gas mark 2.

Take the duck out of the fridge and bring to room temperature. Take it out of the marinade and brush off any excess.

Put a large frying pan onto a medium-low heat and add a knob of butter (be careful not to burn) or some sunflower oil. Sprinkle salt on both sides of the duck. Cook the duck breast, skin side down. A small wild duck only needs about 3 to 4 minutes for the skin to crisp up, then you flip the duck breast to cook the other side, until it reaches medium or medium-rare in the centre (2 to 3 minutes).  It takes 4 to 5 minutes if you like it well done.

Once cooked to your preference, take the duck out of the pan and loosely cover with foil to rest for at least 5 minutes. In the meantime, heat the pancakes in the warm oven. Carve the mallard breasts thinly, or shred if well done.

Slice the cucumber and spring onions into fine matchsticks.

Put the spring onions, cucumber, hoisin sauce and duck into separate bowls.  Take the pancakes out of the oven and serve.

Recipe created by Rob Green, image by Michael Powell. 

The Eat Game Awards aim to celebrate the best of wild British produce by recognizing great culinary achievements and other contributions to the cooking and eating of game.  They offer those less familiar with game the chance to get a better understanding of how to cook it and the confidence to include it in their regular culinary repertoires.

Learn more about the Eat Game Awards here

 

Ingredients

Serves: 2

2 wild mallard breasts, skin on
Salt flakes
Knob of butter or sunflower oil for cooking
For the marinade:
2 tbsp hoisin sauce
2 tbsp shaoxing wine (or dry sherry)
Dash of sesame oil
½ tsp five spice powder
1 thumb sized piece of fresh ginger, sliced
4 cloves of garlic, peeled and coarsely chopped
For the garnish:
½ cucumber halved and sliced into thin strips
4 spring onions, topped and tailed and thinly sliced
8 Chinese pancakes
120ml hoisin sauce